Desktop Fails to Boot

OK, I feel like I’m in deep dodo.
What I did.
There is a 2 TB disk installed in the desktop. It was formatted for Win 10 as
NTFS. Sometimes when I mounted the drive under Linux, it would be R/O. I now boot Linux like 99% of the time. After backing up the HDD, I started gparted. I then deleted the partition and set up 4 partitions. First 3 formatted ext4 and the last partition as Fat32.
What happen.
Now Linux boot in emergency mode!
I get message “Error Communtcating to TPM chip” about 8 times.
Then “You are in emergency mode. After logging in, type journalctl -xb to view”
and a couple more lines about the options of which I can not get any to work.


How can deleting a Win 10 partition stop Linux from booting? There was noting on this disk that belong to Linux.
Any suggestion?


Update. I decided to try to boot Win 10. Not only did it boot fine, but the 2 TB disk is still intact! And the data is still there! LM 19.3 did not change the disk as far as Win 10 is concern, but LM won’t boot. Strange!

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@easyt50…Are we talking Windows and Mint on separate drives, or separate partitions
on the same drive? Their is a program called Rescatux that can be burned to CD that
can boot your PC and find the vmlinuz that boots Mint.
“How can deleting a Win 10 partition stop Linux from booting?” Very easy if grub was
somehow installed to the MBR of that drive.

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Thanks for the suggestion.
There is nothing on the 2 TB drive that belongs to Linux Mint 19.3.
I still get the grub boot menu, that’s how I was able to boot Win 10.
I can still boot a LM 19.3 thumb drive.
I just don’t understand 2 things about this problem.
1 - LM said the partitions were deleted, reallocated, and formatted. But none of this happen!
2 - How working on a disk that LM does not any files on causes LM to fail.

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@easyt50…Can you use W10 and do a screenshot of your drives from Desk Management?
Or use your thumb drive and run “lsblk”.

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Screen shot as requested.Screenshot from 2020-10-07 01-29-58

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@easyt50… Where are all your /dev/sda mountpoints?


You may have to remount your partitions. You may also
want to use nano /etc/fstab and see what it is saying.

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@4dandl4, I can’t boot the desktop to show you all the mount points!
The screenshot was from my live drive (USB) booted Linux.

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@easyt50…Do you have a Linux Mint CD or a Gparted laying around that you might boot
your PC. A Mint Live CD and Gparted might give you a little better picture as to what is going on.
You would need a Mint live CD if you have to remount your partitions.

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Screen Shot as requested.

Also the error message I got at boot time is on my laptop also.
“Error Communtcating to TPM chip” about 8 times is normal for me at boot time.

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I can’t believe it, but one line in fstab cause my LM 19.3 system not to boot!
#Data Disk from Win 10
#UUID=“01CFFE9CFCDB7DB0” /media/easyt50/Data ntfs rw 0 0
I commented the above line out and my desktop boots OK.
I have placed it there in an attempt to make a partition in Win 10 R/W.

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@easyt50…So Mint is booting? You do know what TPM is?

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No idea, but I get it on the desktop and also my laptop. Laptop is Mint 20.0.

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@easyt50 TPM stands for Trusted Platform Module, it has something to do with
security and detection. It can be disabled or enabled from the bios, or at least that
is what I read. Google it and you decide.

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There is a reason, why everyone shows big disclaimers and warnings, that editing your /etc/fstab file might result in your system not booting. :smile:

You should always make a backup of this file, before editing it. Once you are unable to boot, restore the file and try a different edit.

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Well @Akito you are 100% right! Honestly, I did not know about the warning. So today I learned something new about Linux.

The real problem was after the change to fstab, the desktop booted fine for several days.
I forgot I had changed fstab and fail to note the change in my personal change log for the desktop.

So it was when I change the disk listed in fstab that the desktop fail to boot. And of course, the fix, was backing out the change.

I might open a new discussion about why Linux gparted fail to format the 2 TB disk.

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Sure, go ahead.
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