NVMe drive - better w/ a PCI card or SATA adapter?

I was recently gifted w/ a new 1TB NVMe type M.2 SSD. :grinning: Neither of my desktop machines have a slot for it… :cry: Searching on Amazon, I find that I can get either PCIE adapter boards that will let you put one of these in a PCI slot, or holders that will make them connect to a SATA hard drive interface for a 2.5" drive…

Any particular reason to prefer one over the other? I’m somewhat leaning towards the SATA drive converter since it would also let me use the drive in my laptop, but I’d be open to either idea…

Any particular plusses or minuses to either?

Would this work as a boot drive?

ex-Gooserider

You might have better driver support for a SATA connection.

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I would try the sata adapter first!!!

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Hi pdecker,
I ask because I don’t know: NVMe is PCIe and is much faster than SATA, but have less support on Linux?

Thanks

Jorge

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Either might work. I would just guess you’ll have a higher chance of success with SATA. It is slower but I think it will be very usable.

If you don’t mind a bit of trial and error, you might be able to make the PCIe card work.

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I found an external (USB3) case for an M.2 drive. I plugged it into a USB3 port on the back of my box and it was picked up and given a drive letter in my W11 box. There’s no reason to suspect it wouldn’t work in a Linux box.

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USB yes. PCIe card, I don’t think would have the same level of driver support. But you could get lucky and it’d work just great. If there is a good return policy maybe give it a try.

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I may actually have spoken to soon, this is the drive Amazon.com, 1TB SSD SP610 PCIe 4.0 NVMe M.2 2280 SSD Internal Solid State Drive, Up to 3600MB/s, 3D NAND TLC Flash, NVMe SSD for Laptop Dynamic SLC Cache

It appears that the traditional SATA1-3 2.5" drive adapters I’ve found don’t seem compatible with this type of drive, just the older SATA B&M Key style… The 2.5" adapters that are compatible are using the newer U.2 / SATA-Express connectors that won’t fit a SATA 1-3 cable…

However the PCI cards appear to be more compatible althought the older PCI-e xand at least one explicitly mentions Linux compatibility w/o needing a driver. The cards are also a bit less expensive :grinning:

ex-Gooserider

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I’ve never had issues with NVMe PCIe cards… Have a 1 TB on my Pop!_OS desktop and another 1 TB in my Pop!_OS Thinkpad…
Maybe 5 years ago there might have been issues - but not these days with modern distros…

I’d always opt for PCIe option for performance… in both my cases, it’s a NVMe PCIe “flat” slot on the system board - but you can go for one of those “upright” riser cards to go into a PCIe slot and mount on the backplane of you ATX desktop case…

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Hi Arthur,

I believe the bigger question is how do you want to use the M.2 SSD.

If you want the convenience of moving or having the data available between the desktop and the laptop, you should go for the external SATA case,

If you want to have a large amount of storage available for the desktop with a boost in I/O (input/output) speed try the adapter for the PCI slot. Performing a little research on the internet should tell you it compatible with Linux.

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I have two possible goals - either to get more, possibly faster storage in one of my two desktop machines, or to do an upgrade of the SATA SSD in my travel laptop, and shift the one currently in that machine to another laptop… There are pluses and minuses to both options… However since it now looks like the SATA adapter isn’t an option the way I thought, I’m probably going to go with the PCIe adapter card.

Data exchange isn’t a significant need, as I have found that Syncthing is a great solution for that concern…

I also have a big collection of spinning external USB drives if I ever actually need them…

ex-Gooserider

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